Validating the genomic signature of pediatric septic shock updating php windows


08-Feb-2020 01:08

This observation does not appear to be an artifact of differential white blood cell counts.

The expression data were analyzed for the presence of signature probe sets for neutrophils, lymphocytes, and monocytes.

A variety of clinical and experimental data indicate that developmental age influences the immune system and hence the host response to sepsis (4,25,26,27,28).

Fundamental observations include widespread repression of gene programs corresponding to the adaptive immune system and biologically significant differential patterns of gene expression across developmental age groups.

The data have also identified gene expression–based subclasses of pediatric septic shock having clinically relevant phenotypic differences.

A series of three recent studies indicate that gene expression–based subclasses of pediatric septic shock may indeed exist and that the subclasses have clinically important phenotypic differences (30,31,32).

The first study in this series attempted to identify subclasses of pediatric septic shock based exclusively on differential patterns of gene expression (30).Comparator groups include age-matched normal controls, critically ill children meeting criteria for sepsis, and critically ill children meeting criteria for the systemic inflammatory response syndrome (SIRS), based on pediatric-specific definitions (1).