Dating patience


11-Jan-2020 20:33

Think of the recent critiques of millennials for being unwilling to “pay their dues” in an entry-level job, jumping from position to position rather than growing and learning.In her 2012 study, Schnitker also examined whether patience helps students get things done.In that same vein, patience is linked to trust in the people and the institutions around us.The road to achievement is a long one, and those without patience—who want to see results immediately—may not be willing to walk it.In relationships with others, patience becomes a form of kindness.Think of the best friend who comforts you night after night over the heartache that just won’t go away, or the grandchild who smiles through the story she has heard her grandfather tell countless times.Having patience means being able to wait calmly in the face of frustration or adversity, so anywhere there is frustration or adversity—i.e., nearly everywhere—we have the opportunity to practice it.

In other words, patience seems to be a skill you can practice—more on that below—and doing so might bring benefits to your mental health.

Finally, patience over daily hassles—traffic jams, long lines at the grocery store, a malfunctioning computer—seems to go along with good mental health.

In particular, people who have this type of patience are more satisfied with life and less depressed.

It’s often exhibited behind closed doors, not on a public stage: A father telling a third bedtime story to his son, a dancer waiting for her injury to heal.

In public, it’s the impatient ones who grab all our attention: drivers honking in traffic, grumbling customers in slow-moving lines.

This kind of selflessness is found among people with all three types of patience mentioned above, not just interpersonal patience: In Schnitker’s 2012 study, all three were associated with higher “agreeableness,” a personality trait characterized by warmth, kindness, and cooperation.